journal: mac

Macworld Expo 2008

Deep thoughts on thin

You’ve all heard about the MacBook Air by now, I’m sure. Bad name aside (MacBook Air? Seriously? Is this the best they could come up with?), there are some who wonder who would buy it, or whether it’ll be a flop.

Yes, people will buy it. No it won’t be a flop.

First, let’s quickly look at who might benefit from something like the MacBook Air:

Students

Having been a student not too long ago, I can tell you that hauling books from class to class all day is no fun. After a while, you feel every single pound, every single ounce of what you’re carrying. Sure, two pounds doesn’t seem like much weight, but when you’re loaded down with books, you’ll take whatever weight reduction you can get. There are a couple drawbacks, however. Since it’s a 13.3-inch screen like the MacBook, it won’t take up any less desk space, which is disappointing and makes it a little less pleasant to use on the tiny desks in lecture halls (I’d love it if Apple brought back something the size of the 12” PowerBook G4, but so it goes). Also, the lack of an Ethernet jack is a drawback, since dormitories typically have Ethernet jacks in every room, and some schools may have regulations against the use of WiFi networks in the dorms. Also, the MacBook Air would not make an ideal primary computer, so it should only be considered by students who can afford to own two computers.

Business travelers


If you travel frequently and need something thin and light to take with you on the plane, and for giving PowerPoint/Keynote presentations, the MacBook Air may be worth considering. Keep in mind, though, that you would probably want to buy an airline power adapter (if those are available for the MacBook Air), since battery can’t be swapped, limiting your productivity on long flights. Aside from that, though, Macbook Air would make a great travel companion for the businessperson on the go.

Other travelers

A nice choice because of its weight, but if you want to watch a DVD on the plane, you’d have to spring for the external SuperDrive. See also: the caveat regarding the battery on long flights/car rides.

The intrepid blogger

For bloggers jumping from trade show to trade show, the MacBook Air would probably make an awesome mobile companion for posting entries to your blog. The 5-hour battery would be sufficient, being that you would likely use it for maybe 10 minutes here, 20 minutes there, with plenty of juice to last through the day (My MacBook with its typical 3 hours of battery life handles a day at Macworld just fine). Also, you’ll be able to carry two more pound of swag versus a typical MacBook. Also, for this sort of task, the lack of an optical drive and the slow hard drive should not be a major issue. The one issue I could see arising is posting video content, since, as far as I know, most DV camcorders use Firewire, which is absent on the MacBook Air (probably because they couldn’t fit the Firewire chipset in the motherboard). Also, there’s the possibility of limited WiFi access, so you may want to buy the USB-Ethernet adapter just in case.

The coffeehouse hopper

You know who you are: you sit in the corner of your local café or coffeehouse, sipping on that double decaf mocha with chocolate sprinkles, reading Digg or Drudge Report, or...whatever. If this sounds even remotely like you, you may want to consider the MacBook Air. Not only is it lightweight and easy to take with you, but it sure is sexy. Maybe you’ll finally get that cute barista to actually engage in conversation with you.

Hey, it could happen. wink

So what?

As some of you know, I spent a little over two years selling computers at the UC Berkeley campus computer store. A good number of our customers would come in looking for a lightweight notebook. Some of them consider buying a Mac, but turn to Windows when they realize that the lightest Mac laptop is in the neighborhood of five pounds. If the MacBook Air can convince even some of those people to buy it instead of an equivalent PC, then it has done its job.

Will I buy one? Probably not. In each of the examples I gave above, the MacBook Air makes a great secondary machine. I use my laptop as my primary computer. As such, I need a full-featured laptop with an optical drive and more ports. And I sure don’t need another laptop. If I owned an iMac or something, however, it would be a different story.

There are plenty of people with a desktop at home who just want a mobile companion to take with them for email, web browsing, word processing, and such. This is the MacBook Air’s target market. It’s a market that exists.

I’ve seen some people compare the MacBook Air to the PowerMac G4 Cube of years past, which flopped. The two products couldn’t be more different. The Cube tried to be both a consumer Mac and a pro Mac. It tried to be a machine for the iMac crowd who wanted more power and a choice in monitors. The problem with the cube was that the iMac crowd stuck with the iMac (until the craze faded, anyway), as they couldn’t justify the additional cost when the iMac got the job done. Basically, with the Cube, Apple needed to deliver a Mac mini; a low-cost desktop Mac where users could hook up their own monitors. This is not what we got. Thus, cool as the Cube was, it was doomed to failure, because it wasn’t what the market wanted.

On the other hand, ultraportable notebooks are very popular right now, and a market already exists for it. And the MacBook Air, despite some notable omissions, still is not that bad for what it is. I’m with Gruber on this one: the MacBook Air may not become Apple’s best-selling Mac ever, but it will sell.


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thinkback

1.

Students:

the MacBook Air would not make an ideal primary computer, so it should only be considered by students who can afford to own two computers

I think you hit the nail on the head.  The MBA is not a great main machine.  IMO that’s going to limit its market to those who can afford (or want to buy) a $1800 second machine.  Oh, have you seen the astronomical prices in the UK?  No way this becomes a popular student machine especially with the proliferation of creating youtube videos (no firewire!) and Apple’s other notebooks being a far superior value.

Business travelers

since battery can’t be swapped, limiting your productivity on long flights. Aside from that, though, Macbook Air would make a great travel companion for the businessperson on the go.

IME there is no “aside from that” when it comes to business travelers.  Gruber is flat out wrong when he talks about people overrating the removable battery.  Sure the general public doesn’t care but this isn’t aimed at them.  Business travelers are a niche that created the need for hot-swapable batteries and multiple batteries in many machines.  The MBA’s battery isn’t going to help it here against entrenched competitors (Thinkpads, Dell, HP, Gateway) or when they have to send the whole machine in to get the battery serviced.

Also, many planes don’t have power adapters.

The inclusion of the webcam is also going to get it banned from many corporations due to security policies.  Other business-class notebooks and handhelds either don’t include them or offer them as an option because of these policies.

A nice choice because of its weight, but if you want to watch a DVD on the plane, you’d have to spring for the external SuperDrive.

If someone is going to be carrying around a Superdrive then they might as well just have bought a Macbook and not dealt with the tether.

The 5-hour battery would be sufficient,

The MBA has the lowest battery life rating of all of Apple’s notebooks.  Since their ratings are typically “best case” and not in general use I don’t see that rating as a plus against the competition.

I’ve seen some people compare the MacBook Air to the PowerMac G4 Cube of years past, which flopped. The two products couldn’t be more different.

This has “Cube” written all over it.

1.  The price is too high.  They should have created the Mac version of the EeePC (read: cheap) if they wanted to pitch it as a second computer.
The non-US prices are ridiculous.
2.  The weird place in Apple’s product line.  The Cube had the same problem in that it didn’t deliver enough value to warrant the cost over the model below it nor to keep people from jumping to the higher model for a few bucks more.
3.  The absolute visceral reaction from the Mac base.  I haven’t seen them react so negatively to a Mac product ever.  Judging by the reaction one would think it came pre-loaded with Vista. a good 2/3rds of the Macrumors vistors voted it negative.

IMO Apple really needed a Macbook Mini which entered Apple into the sub-$1000 (and not $999 either) notebook category.  Something in between a EeePC and a Macbook.  IIRC reports are that Asus sold like 400,000 of those machines.  The MBA won’t manage that many but a Macbook Mini ($600) could do so easily.

A Macbook Mini would be more like the Mac Mini than the MBA/Cube.

4. It has at least one massive drawback (compared to the competition) in every possible market it could be sold to.  They really just cut too much out of it.  I can see no optical drive and the soldered in ram but the lack of firewire and other ports probably kills it for a lot of people.
The lack of a removable battery, a no camera option, and 3G will kill it with business people.
And the price will kill it for most others especially internationally.

That said, a few years from now when machines like this ship with Wireless USB, WiMax, better battery technology, and SSD drives standard then it’ll be different… but one could have said similar things about the Cube too.

2.

Nice comment.

IIRC, the iPod mini had a similar reaction. Meanwhile, I suspect the Cube drew a more positive response, but I have no real recollection of that.

If anything *does* kill the MBA, though, it’ll probably be the battery issue.

But don’t take my word for it. It’ll certainly be interesting to see how it unfolds.

3.

It has for-travelling-people written all over it.
I think it’s not for multimedia creation or viewing videos for that matter either. I think it’s targeted at companies/working people travelling a lot, like journalists, salesmen or a modern messiah like Al Gore.... and so on.

If any of you have too many objections on it then it’s simply not for you. I’ve heard that the Greenpeace like the MBA, even though it’s not green enough as they say.

http://arstechnica.com/journals/apple.ars/2 008/01/16/greenpeace-responds-to-macbook-air

4.

It has for-travelling-people written all over it.

Not really since it’s still has the footprint of a MB and there are numerous other choices that are notably superior.  Also, the MBA’s ability to run the Mac OS doesn’t help it here at all because the mass majority of “traveling people” run Windows by choice.

5.

Not really since it’s still has the footprint of a MB and there are numerous other choices that are notably superior.

Then you’ve not understood the point. It’s not about a huge amount of features but about coolness and portability. It’s a lot easier to carry around than a, say, Macbook Pro. I know for a fact that a lot of journalists will love it.

Also, the MBA’s ability to run the Mac OS doesn’t help it here at all because the mass majority of “traveling people” run Windows by choice.

Then I feel sorry for them not knowing any better. wink
But seriously, you should get a reality-check, Macs are selling better than ever and Apple are receiving more and more switchers every day.

With a portable Mac market share (# of sold units) varying from month to month but between 14 and 17% and increasing.
And to add cream to the carrots, we know that Macs last a lot longer than that cheap crap most people buy and Mac owners tend to buy new computers a lot less often because of that which means that the installed base out there is with high probability much bigger, which in turn means a lot of potential buyers.

I’d even stretch it as far as stating that there are more Mac users “out there” than HP users.

So that “Windows by choice” is baloney.

6.

I’ve never been a fan of ultra portable laptops, but I’m not their intended market. They’ve been around for years, so there is obviously a healthy demand for them.

A notebook without an optical drive isn’t new. Sony and Dell both sell them, and they cost a lot more than the Mac Book Air and come with much slower processors. So just from a quick glance, the Mac Book Air is priced very well.

Apple had 44% Mac unit growth year-over-year. Let’s not waste our time talking about how many travelers want the crappy Windows Vista versus how many want the Mac OS. It’s irrelevant. And besides, last time I checked, the Mac runs Windows.

7.

With a portable Mac market share (# of sold units) varying from month to month but between 14 and 17% and increasing.

Mac Market share actually went down in the 4th quarter compared to the 3rd quarter.  The 2.85% worldwide market share they were able to grab is STILL lower than what they had in 2000, 1999, 1998, and 1997.

I’d even stretch it as far as stating that there are more Mac users “out there” than HP users.

Not even Mac Fan would say something that stupid. In q4 2007, HP sold more machines than Apple has in the past two years.  In total, HP sold over 49 million PC’s in 2007. That’s more machines than Apple has sold in the last dozen years.
One single year of HP sales nearly doubles the entire Mac install base (about 25 million according to AAPL).
There’s your reality check.

And to add cream to the carrots, we know that Macs last a lot longer than that cheap crap most people buy and Mac owners tend to buy new computers a lot less often because of that which means that the installed base out there is with high probability much bigger, which in turn means a lot of potential buyers.

That’s not only contradictory but demonstratively untrue.

1.  Macs don’t last longer than comparable PC’s.  They use the same parts and the same manufacturers (Toshiba, Quantas, Asus etc.) as just about everyone else.
1a.  Even Macintouch stats and the 2007 consumer reports show that average Mac repair stats are fight inline with the rest of the industry (minus some Macs models with astronomical failure rates).
1b. Go to system profiler on any Mac and you’re not going to see anything major that doesn’t ship in the equivalent PC.
2.  The most reasonable explanations as to why Mac users upgrade their hardware less often is because of Apple’s anemic product update schedule.  According to Mactactic and Macrumors the average Mac product update is between 6 months and 9 months with some models exceeding that (Mac Pro went 18 months).  Every other PC manufacturer with a strong retail presence (Dell, HP, Acer, Toshiba, Gateway etc.) goes no more than 3 months and often there are numerous specials and sales during that 3 months.
Why buy a new machine if Apple’s new ones are only slightly faster (if that) and still at the same price?

3.  If the install base is buying less often then on any particular day you have less potential buyers (from the install base) not more.  You have your logic backwards.

4.  They gained 2.4 million more sales this year and HP gained 11 million. Acer gained 6 million and Toshiba gained 3.5 million (with almost no desktop sales).

8.

The 2.85% worldwide market share they were able to grab is STILL lower than what they had in 2000, 1999, 1998, and 1997.

Yeah, worldwide market share became important when Apple started kicking ass in the USA.

Apple’s market share on the Net was 8.01% Dec. 30-31 2007.

Not even Mac Fan would say something that stupid.

Like Apple would switch back to PPC because of a drop in sales because of the switch to Intel?

Like Apple would switch to the NT kernel?

Like CoreImage won’t do 16 bit or 3D?

Like Leopard won’t be 64 bit?

Like Office had nothing to do with the DoJ anti-trust case against Microsoft?

Like Windows Vista doesn’t have Control Panels?

No, I wouldn’t say something so stupid. smile

Macs don’t last longer than comparable PC’s.  They use the same parts and the same manufacturers (Toshiba, Quantas, Asus etc.) as just about everyone else

Talk about stupidity…

So you think the quality of an eMachines PC is the same as an IBM or Dell because PCs are all using the same parts and manufacturers? LOL

Even Macintouch stats and the 2007 consumer reports show that average Mac repair stats are fight inline with the rest of the industry (minus some Macs models with astronomical failure rates)

Have you even read any of Consumer Reports surveys in regards to reliability? There is a huge gap between Apple/Dell and Compaq/Gateway. There is no “rest of the industry” reliability rate. There is a huge range, and Apple is consistently at the top.

Are you this ignorant, or are you just lying again?

Why buy a new machine if Apple’s new ones are only slightly faster (if that) and still at the same price?

You just stated that Apple uses the same hardware as Windows PCs and now you are saying that Apple’s new computers offer less speed improvement than PCs? LOL

And in regards to the idea that Macs don’t have much of speed increase when they are updated, where is HP’s 1.8 Ghz Core 2 Duo ultra-portable? They sell a 1.2 Ghz model for $2,299 (I can’t imagine running Vista on that, which is why, I suppose, they still offer XP). Where is the HP dual 3.2 Ghz 5482 Harpertown workstation? They have the 3.16 Ghz version, and if you configure it with the same RAM and same hard drive and same Quadro FX 5600 video card, the HP costs $1,905 more.

9.

Yeah, worldwide market share became important when Apple started kicking ass in the USA

Once again proving you’re a dumbass.  USA marketshare is so important that Apple doesn’t even publish data on it.  They publish data based on region.  The USA is in the “Americas” region, which also includes Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

It’s sad that Apple fan’s have their standards so low.  6th place (in the US/Americas) is now “kicking ass”.  IDC and Gartner expected they would sell over 1 million in the USA alone so they projected them to be 4th. According to Apple’s financial statements, they only sold 841 thousand in this entire hemisphere.  That still has them in 6th (could be lower but they only show stats for the top 5) behind Toshiba… who only sells laptops in the US and has no retail stores.

Like Windows Vista doesn’t have Control Panels?

Liar.  There’s no DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL.  Which your dumbass didn’t even realize even though you wrote a whole article about trying to find it.

Talk about stupidity…

So you think the quality of an eMachines PC is the same as an IBM or Dell because PCs are all using the same parts and manufacturers? LOL

Yes, your post is full of stupidity.  IBM doesn’t make PC’s.  They haven’t had a PC division since 2005.
Read what I said: “just about everyone else”.  eMachines isn’t included nor is Panasonic, FalconNW, Hypersonic, Alienware, Samsung, and Fujitsu (among others) because they don’t use the companies I named. Some are better some are worse.  However, Dell, HP, Acer, Gateway, Apple, Toshiba, and Sony brands do use roughly the same manufacturers for comparable parts (and comparable machines).
Ironically, the optical drive and hard drive in my Mini are the same brand and model line as the ones that came with my Toshiba notebook. Anecdotal but it proves my point.

Have you even read any of Consumer Reports surveys in regards to reliability? There is a huge gap between Apple/Dell and Compaq/Gateway. There is no “rest of the industry” reliability rate. There is a huge range, and Apple is consistently at the top.

Are you this ignorant, or are you just lying again?

No, you’re ignorant and clearly didn’t read it.  The October/November 2007 Consumer reports survey has Apple laptops a number of required repairs that is higher than the average of all the other PC makers in the survey.  In fact, Apple tied for the highest number of repairs in the survey. 
According to the PC World notebook survey’s of “failed components” and “failed core components”, Apple has come out average for almost at least 3 out of the last 4 years (I haven’t seen the 4th year yet).  Interestingly, E-Machines took the top rating in notebooks a few years back.
http://www.pcworld.com/zoom?id=118514&p age=5&zoomIdx=1
http://www.pcworld.com/zoom?id=123409&p age=9&zoomIdx=1
Macintouch surveys say Mac notebooks had about a 21% first year failure rate between 1999-2005… which is higher than the industry average put out by PC World and Consumer Reports.

Apple’s desktops aren’t comparable industry average for no other reason than the fact of Apple’s average desktop price being $1505 (2008) vs the industry average of less than $800 (Gartner for 2007). IMO that doesn’t fall under the “comparable” banner.

Like Leopard won’t be 64 bit?

Liar.  Quote me (and link to it).  I said Leopard won’t be fully 64-bit. And it isn’t!  I was 100% correct.
Tiger, Panther, and Jag 10.2.8 all had 64-bit support but just like Leopard they aren’t fully 64-bit.  The kernel isn’t 64-bit, the drivers aren’t 64-bit, nor is 99% of the system.  In fact, the only 64-bit binary in a default install is Chess.app.
Do you have an ADC account?  It’s all right there.
http://www.opensource.apple.com/darwinsource/
http://episteme.arstechnica.com/eve/forums/ a/tpc/f/8300945231/m/678006608831
http://macguild.org/wwdc/wwdc06.html
“Kernel processes will still run in 32-bit memory space.”
“The Leopard kernel will still be 32 bit.”

That makes it only marginally more “64-bit” than Windows 2000 AD but nowhere near various other *nixes or Windows x64.

And in regards to the idea that Macs don’t have much of speed increase when they are updated,

Learn to read.  I didn’t say nor imply how much of a speed increase there was when Apple updates.  I said they update less often.

where is HP’s 1.8 Ghz Core 2 Duo ultra-portable?

How is that relevant to “the idea that Macs don’t have much of speed increase when they are updated” (strawman) or anything I actually said?  Besides, Apple doesn’t offer an ultra-portable anyway.  13.3 with short battery life and external optical/ethernet/usb/video out doesn’t count as “ultra-portable”.  It’s got the same footprint as the Macbook.

If you’re getting at the “overpriced” issue then it’s less of an issue of “it costs more than the competition” (it generally does) but more that they should have made something different and cheaper.  A Macbook Mini made like an EeePC, OLPC, Classmate PC but with Apple style would do wonders for their market share.  The expectation is that the Eee PC will outsell all Apple notebooks in 2008… as they predict 5 million to sell.
I think Apple could do it much better. That’s all.

But for your entertainment:
2.2Ghz C2D, 160GB HD, 13.3inch, DVD Burner, TWO VIDEO CARDS for $1749 direct (likely less at pricegrabber):
http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/ servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&store Id=10151&langId;=-1&productId=81985529216652 88203
Same thing from Dell with slightly better specs and 3yr warranty for $1300:
http://www.dell.com/content/products/produc tdetails.aspx/xpsnb_m1330?c=us&cs=19&l=e n&s=dhs&~tab=bundlestab

Asus
$1499
http://www.excaliberpc.com/Asus_U3S-A1B_Pia no_Black_Integrated/90NQFA913ED63EQL850T/partinf o-id-582059.html
$1549
http://www.excaliberpc.com/Asus_U6E-A1_Inte l_Core_2_Duo_T7500/90NFDA6231424EQL750T/partinfo -id-583989.html

Acer w/ 4GB RAM, 250GB HD, and 7hr battery life
http://www.compudirect.com/cgi-bin/start_ne w.cgi?home&main_src=product_view_f.cgi&m ain_param=DNH12_06-1223+pricegrab+Component

There are at least two dozen comparable models (once Lenovo, Fujitsu, Dell configs and others are factored in) that I can think of off the top of my head.

blah blah blah… Harpertown workstation… blah blah blah

They don’t sell those at retail now do they?  Please read the “strong retail presence” part of my post.

Like Apple would switch to the NT kernel?

Lying again. Second time you’ve brought this up and failed to prove it. Never said they would.  They should move to it or Solaris (!).  Instead Apple looks like they’re just going to use Sun’s file system… but offering Windows compatibility would be awesome.  Apparently Apple thinks so too:
http://www.winehq.org/pipermail/wine-devel/ 2007-November/060846.html

And of course there’s the whole thing about Apple actually shipping a way to install Windows and Windows drivers on your Mac:
http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/bootca mp.html

Software made to allow you to give Mac users Windows compatibility is the apparently best mac software available:
http://www.parallels.com/en/products/deskto p/awards/

If Windows is so crappy then why do so many Mac users want to run it? (BTW, Vista is shipping on 96% of all retail PC’s).

10.

USA marketshare is so important that Apple doesn’t even publish data on it.

Of course they don’t. IDC and Gartner do.

It’s sad that Apple fan’s have their standards so low.  6th place (in the US/Americas) is now “kicking ass”. 

Huh? In Q3, they were ranked 3rd in the U.S., behind Dell and HP.

Toshiba and HP have been seeing growth of around 16%. Apple’s growth has been more than double that.

But my point was that you PC zealots now focus on worldwide market share because it’s the lowest figure.

Kicking ass is having 44% unit growth at a time the whole PC industry is seeing 7.2% growth.

Kicking ass is going up from 6.2% to 8.1% in a single year.

Liar.  There’s no DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL

No, you went on and on about how “control panel” was Mac-centric terminology, not even realizing that Vista has Control Panel Home.

What do you call the “Display Settings” control panel? Chopped liver?

You are just so confused right now because of the retarded way Windows handles control panels, that’s all. You even thought I was in the Device Manager when I was in a control panel. You see? That’s crap.

, your post is full of stupidity.  IBM doesn’t make PC’s.  They haven’t had a PC division since 2005.

So all the Thinkpads sold in 2005 disappeared? LOL. Think before you write. We are talking about reliability surveys of existing users.

Read what I said: “just about everyone else”. 

I’m reading what I quoted.

eMachines isn’t included nor is Panasonic, FalconNW, Hypersonic, Alienware, Samsung, and Fujitsu (among others) because they don’t use the companies I named. Some are better some are worse

Read what I quoted.

Your point is still seriously flawed.

First off, we are talking about the Mac Book Air in this article. Where are all those components in a Dell?

Which Dell has Apple’s motherboard?

Secondly, you think 20 companies making 20 different PCs with components from the same manufacturers are going to have identical reliability rates? LOL. You see, I know you are full of shit on this because I know that you know that two PCs can behave completely differently just based on the combination of the components configured, the drivers used, the BIOS used, etc.

How is that relevant to “the idea that Macs don’t have much of speed increase when they are updated

It’s a counter to the notion that PCs offer greater speed increases when updated. The MBA completely slaughters similar PC notebooks.

Besides, Apple doesn’t offer an ultra-portable anyway

http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,141360/ar ticle.html
http://www.bladewatch.com/2008/01/15/apple- launches-ultra-portable-notebook/
http://www.slashgear.com/macbook-air-ultrap ortable-info-leaked-by-apple-supplier-159667.php
http://www.gearlog.com/2008/01/apple_introd uces_ultraportable.php

I think Apple could do it much better. That’s all.

That’s predictable, really. I don’t have a problem with you not liking the new Mac. I think the idea that Mac users don’t buy new Macs as often as PC users (PC zealots used to argue the opposite and harp on expansion) because of speed differences is complete BS. Macs use Intel processors!

But for your entertainment:
2.2Ghz C2D, 160GB HD, 13.3inch, DVD Burner, TWO VIDEO CARDS for $1749 direct (likely less at pricegrabber):
http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/ servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&store Id=10151&langId;=-1&productId=81985529216652 88203

Oh, you mean the “ultra portable” from Sony that has almost the identical footprint as the Mac Book and has a 13.3” screen and a battery life of 2.5-4 hours and weighs 4.2 lbs? LOL. ROFL!!!

Please tell me you don’t take yourself seriously and you just bullshit on the Web to kill some time on your hands.

Same thing from Dell with slightly better specs and 3yr warranty for $1300

More notebooks that weigh 33% more and are much thicker…

They don’t sell those at retail now do they?

Of course they do.

But the point, again, is to counter your implication that PCs get better speed increases when they are updated. Those new HP workstations are the opposite, they are slower than the latest Mac update.

Lying again. Second time you’ve brought this up and failed to prove it. Never said they would

You want me to spend time, again, and find the post where you stated something that you now deny you ever said? Like when you denied you ever said Apple would switch back to PPC because of a dive in sales because of the switch to Intel?

If Windows is so crappy then why do so many Mac users want to run it? (BTW, Vista is shipping on 96% of all retail PC’s).

If Vista is so great, why is XP still offered a year after it shipped?

I thought I put the whole “Windows is crap” thing to rest. I have a few more parts to do on that subject.

I run Windows myself! Do I do this because I think it’s great? No, I do this because of the monopoly Microsoft holds on the personal computer operating system market.

11.

That Sony VAIO isn’t even out yet and is a Mac Book but costs $275 more.

What OS does that Sony come with? Windows XP...next month.

If you are going to present me PC notebooks that have TFT screens, 802.11g mini cards, weigh 33% more, are 50% thicker and compare them to the MBA, you are wasting our time.

12.

Been a while since our entire reader base has been involved in a discussion. wink

13.

Tracked: en.wikipedia.org

Deep Thought: Deep thoughts on thin

Tracked on: en.wikipedia.org at 03-Sep-14 09:14 AM

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